The second screen of Kassa

With a magazine, a lively community and a very busy website, Kassa has grown into a cross-media brand. The challenge for developing a second screen application was to connect all these elements logically, but also enriching each other. The content of Kassa has always been based on what the editors receive from consumers: their problems, complaints and comments are central

With a magazine, a lively community and a very busy website, Kassa has grown into a cross-media brand. The challenge for developing a second screen application was to connect all these elements logically, but also enriching each other.

The content of Kassa has always been based on what the editors receive from consumers: their problems, complaints and comments are central. With the application, the TV program wants to take the next step in helping consumers with the problems they face. The Kassa Panel app gives you the space to involve consumers even more in the content during and around the broadcast. In this way it wants to become a quality mark that consumers can trust.

Fig .: The Cashier Panel on TV, laptop and tablet.

The Cashier Panel
During the broadcast, viewers can vote and influence the program. The application is divided into four main parts. Among them is a low-threshold functionality: What do you think of this consumer problem? What do you think of the debate? What do you think of the products? Questions that viewers can answer directly during the broadcast.

The part 'the test' is most prominent in the program. At the beginning of the program, the viewer is invited to take part in 'the test' at home via the Cashier Panel. At the end of the program this result will be shared and placed next to the result of the expert panel. Other parts from the app are also immediately back on TV. In this way guests are confronted with the opinion of the public, and results are shown in pictures during table discussions.

Fig: During the broadcast viewers give their opinion on program components

Before and after the broadcast
Not only during, but also before and after the broadcast, the Cashier Panel is used to get input from consumers. The editorial team will submit questions to the panel during the week. This is used to compile the program. For example, the panel thinks about program items, chooses the destination of the Belbus or indicates which products Kassa must test. The accompanying newsletter and the website are used to ensure participation in the panel during the week.

By clearly identifying who the users are and what their wishes, questions and possibly their own expertises are, a very interesting and rich knowledge bank is created. This makes it possible to link consumers to specific expertise, themes and / or questions. Of course, the users can also 'collect' via the app and thus form a fist against a certain misconduct.

Fig: Consumers think along with the editors before and after the broadcast

Since the launch in early September, tens of thousands of viewers participated in the Cashier Panel. Both during the development process and after the first broadcast, the app has been optimized a lot on the basis of a number of important insights.

Simply integrate the second screen into the program
Many two-screen applications are not fully integrated in the program, and are therefore quite independent of them. At Kassa, the second screen has been taken into account from the first pilot of the new format. The program and the application therefore work hand-in-hand.

Develop together with the editors
The editing of the program, the television makers, is key in the success of a secondscreen application. They know the viewer the best, and know what works and does not work on TV. By linking the editors to digital thinkers, you ultimately get an app that is both editorial and a good digital experience.

Link the results back to the viewer, but do not overwhelm them with information
Participants of the second screen want to see what is done with their opinion. The feedback of the results in the program is therefore very important. At Kassa this happens in several ways: sometimes prominently in the picture, sometimes in passing through the presenter. At the same time, the program for non-users must still be interesting.

Do not stop at the broadcast
Interaction with the viewer does not stop after the broadcast. Viewers can also be involved in the editorial choices with the second screen after the broadcast, and through the Kassa Panel app visitors will also have the opportunity to think along the whole week. That way you keep your attention.

Not too much distraction, the focus must remain at the first screen
The most common complaint when using the second screen is that it distracts attention from the first screen. It does not have to be a match that provides the most interesting content. By specifically and cleverly navigating to specific and short, clear input moments, the second screen becomes a useful and additional input tool that leads to an enriching TV experience.