Research Oracle: growth of BYOD in Europe hampered by concern about safety

Oracle interviewed seven hundred European companies on the subject Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) as part of the Oracle European BYOD Index. There is still a lot of resistance in a large number of regions, this arises from concerns about the security of company data on devices, user identity and application security

Oracle interviewed seven hundred European companies on the subject Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) as part of the Oracle European BYOD Index. There is still a lot of resistance in a large number of regions, this arises from concerns about the security of company data on devices, user identity and application security. The organizations that have embraced BYOD are better able to benefit from BYOD, such as reducing IT costs and increasing employee productivity, than those who reject it. The currently available solutions offer advanced security management for business devices and personal devices, while the user experience remains simple. Organizations have the flexibility to give access to users' devices and more control by isolating company and personal data. This makes secure business application access and governance possible. The Benelux is in the top three of the most mature approach to BYOD, just after the Nordics and the United Kingdom.

News facts:

Europe

  • To find out how companies in Europe are currently thinking about the Bring Your Own Device trend (BYOD), Oracle publishes the European BYOD Index Report [1].
  • The report contains a number of notable figures:
    • almost half (44 percent) of the companies in Europe have an aversion to BYOD or allow it only in exceptional circumstances.
    • Another 29 percent only allow senior employees to use it
  • 22 percent prohibit data or information stored on a BYOD device while twenty percent have no rules at all.
    • more than half does not manage smartphones as part of a BYOD program.
    • the security of information is the greatest concern; 45 percent are very concerned about device security, 53 percent about application security and 63 percent about data security.
    • The research also shows that a large part of this concern is related to the knowledge of all the possibilities offered by modern security solutions:
      • 37 percent have never heard of containerization (separating business data from personal data).
      • almost a third does not use any form of Mobile Device Management.
      • 22 percent has never heard of Mobile Device Management.
      • Those who embrace BYOD have a more complete picture, and treat both tablets and smartphones as BYOD; have successfully addressed many security issues; and are prepared for an even greater change in future BYOD developments.

The Benelux (100 respondents)

  • The Benelux is in the top three of the most mature approach to BYOD, just after the Nordics and the United Kingdom (figure 1).
  • The Benelux is number one when it comes to considering both smartphones and tablets and BYOD devices (Figure 2).
  • Together with the Nordics and DCH, companies in the Benelux are most convinced that the security of BYOD devices can be managed.
  • Companies in the Benelux are also in third place in terms of knowledge about containerization, again just behind DCH and the Nordics.
  • According to the Index, companies in the Benelux are therefore quite far in their acceptance of BYOD and how BYOD can be safely executed.

'Omarmers' versus 'Denkenners' [2]
The respondents consist of two groups: organizations that include BYOD omarmers ("Omarmers") and organizations that deny it ("Denkenners").

  • 83 percent of the Omarmers manage smartphones and tablets as part of BYOD. On the other hand, 73 percent of Dennenners do not include smartphones in their BYOD approach.
  • Two-thirds of the deniers are very concerned about security in general, as opposed to only six percent of the Omarmers. When it comes to specific aspects of security:
    • 86 percent of the Deniers are very concerned about the security of data and information, compared with only 21 percent of the Omarmers.
    • 65 percent of the deniers do not manage data and information security or allow it to be unencrypted on devices, compared to only seven percent of the Omarmers.
    • Omarmers know which technologies are available; almost eighty percent of the Omarmers, for example, use a certain form of specific mobile application management, compared with twelve percent of the deniers.
    • The Omarmers are prepared for change; more than two thirds of them accept the need to embrace change in types of devices or approaches or see the BYOD market becoming increasingly complex. Only eleven percent of the deniers share these insights.

Differences between European countries and branches

  • Nations:
    • the Nordics and the combination Germany / Switzerland (DCH) are the countries with the most adult approach to the BYOD problem, with a respective Index [3] score of 5.65 and 5.32.
    • the Iberian Peninsula and Italy see the most challenges in BYOD, demonstrating their Index scores of 3.87 and 4.05. These countries also had the largest share of BYOD-deniers.
    • Branches:
      • the communication branch was the overall number one, with an Index score of 6.98. The media industry was a good second with 6.43.
      • on the other hand, financial services 3.96 and the public sector only score 3.31.
      • Interestingly, the media sector clearly has the largest share of Omarmers and the financial services sector the smallest. The public sector has the largest number of deniers and the communication sector has the least deniers.

Supporting quotes:

  • "BYOD - if properly implemented - companies can really deliver a lot; from increased employee productivity and lower hardware costs for IT to more opportunities to attract the best young talent, "said Clive Longbottom, Research Director at Quocirca. "It is good to see that some organizations in Europe are embracing BYOD to achieve these benefits. The Oracle BYOD Index, however, shows cause for concern as to the resistance that many others have to the acceptance that BYOD is happening all around them and against embracing this change in their own favor. "
  • "The security problem seems to have led to denial and resistance to BYOD in many organizations across Europe, " said Suhas Uliyar, vice president of Mobile Strategy Product Management at Oracle. "Technologies such as containerization, end-to-end encryption and device and application management integrated with unified enterprise identity store capabilities that are available in Oracle's mobile portfolio and implemented with global Fortune 100 customers - can support BYOD and Corporate Owned. Protect Personal Enabled (COPE) environment. It is essential that those involved in the BYOD ecosystem make this clear to their organizations. This should result in a large increase in the number of European organizations that achieve the benefits that BYOD offers. "


[1] Quocirca, which carried out the research for Oracle, interviewed 700 managers in a range of large and very large companies in the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, the Iberian Peninsula (Spain / Portugal), the Benelux (Belgium / the Netherlands) / Luxembourg) and the Nordics (Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden).

[2] An analysis of the question 'How does your organization see BYOD?' reveals two groups. Those who replied: 'We are not happy with it, but can not stop it' or 'We only allow BYOD in exceptional circumstances' (313 respondents) can be considered as 'BYOD deniers'. Those who responded: "We have a list of BYOD devices that are acceptable" or "We allow anyone to use BYOD" can be considered as "BYOD-omarmers" (187 respondents).

[3] Quocirca uses a development model to calculate the index and asks a number of questions - to be assessed on a scale of 0 to 10 - about the view that a respondent has on a range of topics. The average of these scores results in a series of sub-indexes and an overall index score, with which comparisons between groups can be made and progress can be monitored and measured.

Notes to Editors

Index method
Quocirca uses a development model to calculate the index and asks a number of questions - to be assessed on a scale of 0 to 10 - about the view that a respondent has on a range of subjects. The average of these scores results in a series of sub-indexes and an overall index score, with which comparisons between groups can be made and progress can be monitored and measured.