Maggy: all you can read for 5.99 euros

Digitizing content was already well-known for Michael Croll and Rutger Tijkotte. In Sirimedia they convert print into interactive magazines that are screen-proof. A year and a half ago, the gentlemen came up with the idea to offer unlimited journals digitally via an app for a fixed price. The 61, 450 euros they received from the Press Fund were used for market research and the prototype of Maggy

Digitizing content was already well-known for Michael Croll and Rutger Tijkotte. In Sirimedia they convert print into interactive magazines that are screen-proof. A year and a half ago, the gentlemen came up with the idea to offer unlimited journals digitally via an app for a fixed price. The 61, 450 euros they received from the Press Fund were used for market research and the prototype of Maggy.

And there was Maggy, on January 13 last. Since then, fifteen hundred users have already signed up. I spoke to Michael and Rutger about their ins and outs of their service in their office on the Prinsengracht.

We start with the tweet: how would you describe Maggy in just 140 characters?

"All you can read: 30 magazines for € 5.99. Happy reading! "

So instead of the stack of magazines on the coffee table, do we download an app now?

"With Maggy you can read unlimited articles from magazines. We have come to the point where people just as easily read articles on a screen as from tangible magazines. For publishers, it is a challenge to keep readers. We see Maggy as an opportunity to appeal to another target group, a group that is not currently reading magazines. With the app we make the translation from print to digital, without static PDFs, but with nicely designed items. The eye wants something too."

Is everyone ready for Maggy?

"Most people do, I think. But you still keep differences. Some readers want the pages to slide through their fingers, and there is nothing wrong with that. With Maggy we aim for a new way of reading instead of completely replacing printed magazines. "

How was the prototype received at the test group?

"Very positive. We wanted to go live with a minimal viable product, the prototype that we put down was deliberately a tight one. With the advantage that we receive valuable feedback from the 500 active beta users on the operation of the app and the range of articles as quickly as possible. For example, we want to develop a tablet app because the demand for it is great. Maggy now only exists as a mobile app. What is striking is that some users outside the test group take the trouble to write us useful and constructive criticism. We are very happy with that and we wholeheartedly encourage it. "

Which magazines can we already read?

"Hearst, WPG and New Skool Media are currently the publishers of which we offer articles. In the beginning it was still quite a challenge to contract publishers, but since the launch of Maggy we are increasingly approached ourselves. We can not yet name names, but the reading offer will soon increase significantly. "

What is the difference between Maggy?

"In the 'all you can read' and in the cooperation with major publishers. In addition, we consider the quality of the articles as a USP. You do not have to zoom in and out on a PDF, the content is seamlessly tuned to smartphones. From Maggy we highlight remarkable articles every day and we offer a personalized section in the app, in which articles are selected based on your profile. You also have insight into the most read pieces and there is a search function in which you can find every article of every connected journal. "

What does the earnings model look like?

"We use a 70-30 model: publishers receive 70% of the revenue. This amount is divided among them on the basis of the total time that readers spend on their articles. It helps them to understand the popularity of their authors and subjects. Maggy is free for the first 30 days. We have just been live for two weeks, waiting for the first figures. "

What purpose have you set so soon after the launch of the app?

"At the end of 2016, fifty thousand users read their magazines through Maggy. Collaboration with, for example, telephone contract providers is on the agenda. And we are shifting our limits. We have researched the potential of Maggy internationally and want to expand into English-language journals and perhaps a collaboration with airline companies. The sky is the limit. "

*) This is an article in the series of the Accenture Innovation Awards that I wrote in collaboration with my colleague Lianne Plouvier.