WiMAX becomes the successor wifi

The distinction between wireless networks, such as WiFi and 3G, will disappear. That is what Intel CEO Paul Otellini predicted at the 3GSM Congress in Cannes. WiMax, Wi-Fi for long distances in particular, will have to provide for that upheaval. With WiMax (Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access) a large area of ​​wireless internet can be provided. Th

The distinction between wireless networks, such as WiFi and 3G, will disappear. That is what Intel CEO Paul Otellini predicted at the 3GSM Congress in Cannes. WiMax, Wi-Fi for long distances in particular, will have to provide for that upheaval.

With WiMax (Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access) a large area of ​​wireless internet can be provided. The standard makes it possible, among other things, to design so-called Metropolitan Area Networks (MANs) as an alternative to ADSL and TV cable networks to end users. The range is about 50 kilometers versus 100 meters for current WiFi standards with 75 megabits per second as maximum bandwidth.
Because of the large range, the costs per user are low. These are estimated at 100 to 150 euros, and 5000 to 30, 000 euros per base station.
Otellini thinks that WiMax will break through in 2006 to 2008. WiMax will be available in laptops in 2006, and from 2007 onwards in mobile phones.
Now all companies are busy preparing. Various companies, including Nokia and Fujitsu, have joined the WiMAX forum. In December the Dutch channel company Nozema joined the forum. Nozema offers supporting wireless internet services for the professional market since last year. In addition to WiMax (802.16), the company plans to offer Mobile-fi (802.20), a broadband variant for mobile traffic, in the future.
AT & T, British Telecom and Nextel have in turn announced that they will work with WiMAX, on the understanding that all sorts of problems still have to be solved. WiMax and Wi-Fi are currently still separate networks, and interference may occur.
Intel wants to change that: it is working with Siemens on future base stations and wants to develop processors and sender / receivers that can combine all broadband variants. Intel already revealed some details in Cannes about its next generation of mobile phone processors, including a dual mode UMTS / broadband CDMA (WCDMA) solution. The so-called Hermon processor is also suitable for video telephony.