Report Web 2.0 Expo Berlin, day 2

Day 2 of Web 2.0 Expo in Berlin provides new insights on, among other things, mobile marketing and behavioral targeting. With both, it is about focused communication, for which information about the consumer is necessary. But how do you gather that information? And there appears to be an agreement between online advertising and German sausage

Day 2 of Web 2.0 Expo in Berlin provides new insights on, among other things, mobile marketing and behavioral targeting. With both, it is about focused communication, for which information about the consumer is necessary. But how do you gather that information? And there appears to be an agreement between online advertising and German sausage. Rebecca Rijnders reports.

In the session on mobile marketing, it appears that we are still in a deadlock. Brands want to be able to target well, but consumers do not provide enough information to make the right match .

One possibility is that you encourage people to tell something about themselves, for example through discounts. The younger generation does not have any trouble to expose themselves, a fact that the new Finnish mobile operator Blyk responds to. Young people can call for free if they are willing to receive up to six advertising messages per day, supplemented by surveys to refine their profile, which makes it more interesting for advertisers.

Mobile branding

Blyk actually sells media space to advertisers, who can thus communicate with their target group in a more targeted way.

A successful campaign was for the clothing brand Miss Selfridge. Users were asked three times how much a certain product costs and if they had answered all three questions correctly, they got a bonus. Pure branding, but it works especially if you build a relationship with your target group, and not with a one-off action, says Marko Ahtisaari from Blyk.

Plank miss

Behavioral targeting is all about the right message, the right person and the right moment. The most primitive form is the Amazon model, where it is assumed that if you buy product X, you are probably also interested in product Y. With this, however, the shelf is also sometimes missed, because you can also give a present for buy your father.

However, banners do not work at all, because most people just ignore it, even if it is aimed at you. People are now used to "throw away" advertising messages.

Ralf Scharnhorst from Media Contacts makes a nice metaphor with German sausage. It was once invented because nobody wanted anything with the leftovers of the meat. For example, online advertising is often still seen: we have some budget left, what will we do with it?

The problem of behavioral marketing is that there is not enough "behavior", according to Frank Wagner of Nugg.ad. If you click on a car five times, you can assume that someone is interested in cars, but who does that? And then, does anyone want to buy a new car immediately? The solution that Nugg.ad offers is that, apart from the measured behavior, they also conduct research as extra information. And that way you can also predict your behavior a bit.

Sales 1.0

There is a discussion about conversational marketing and you need to get to know your target group by talking to them. And not like a drunken man in the pub, who is only about to breathe, but by really listening. Yes, you can have an interesting conversation about an iPod, Wagner responds, but what if you sell a detergent? Let's not pretend that we are all so noble with that Web 2.0, he says soberingly. "It's all just still about Sales 1.0."