Every third Dutchman shops across the border

One in three Dutch people bought something at a foreign online store last quarter. That is thirty percent more than last year and a sign that international web shopping is growing. The Dutch consumer is starting to look around to shop outside the country outside the country. A year ago 23 percent did, now that's thirty percent

One in three Dutch people bought something at a foreign online store last quarter. That is thirty percent more than last year and a sign that international web shopping is growing.

The Dutch consumer is starting to look around to shop outside the country outside the country. A year ago 23 percent did, now that's thirty percent.

A new study by Forrester Research shows that it is mainly people in the smaller EU member states who go abroad for their purchases. And consumers from large countries with an underdeveloped e-commerce market. These are, for example, Italy and Spain. Forty percent of that buys across the border.

Looking at Europe's largest countries, minus Poland but including the Netherlands, 28 percent of consumers buy something abroad a few times a year. A year ago that was 21 percent. It is striking that Germans mainly focus on their own country. With eighteen percent 'foreign buyers', the number of exotic shoppers has even fallen by one percentage point in one year. Forrester makes no statement for this. It is plausible that the size, diversity and maturity of the market play a significant role.

The researcher expects Europeans to buy forty billion euros outside the country in 2018. The majority of these sales, 83 percent, take place in another European country. Not in China, not in America. The average foreign money spent will have grown by now from 363 euros to 428 euros.

Last week a report from E-commerce Europe appeared, the international counterpart of Thuiswinkel.org. It stated that the European e-commerce market grew by 14 percent in 2014 to 424 billion euros.