Publisher pays Twitter bonus

Publisher Gawker Media, known from weblogs such as Gizmodo, io9 and Gawker, once again throws the bonus model for employees, hoping to attract more advertisers and thus more money. Writers receive a bonus on top of their salary, based on unique visitors. Previously, the bonus was still based on page views

Publisher Gawker Media, known from weblogs such as Gizmodo, io9 and Gawker, once again throws the bonus model for employees, hoping to attract more advertisers and thus more money. Writers receive a bonus on top of their salary, based on unique visitors. Previously, the bonus was still based on page views.

Nick Denton, founder of the blog network Gawker Media, expresses the hope that the writers will focus more on articles that draw attention to social media, such as Twitter and Facebook.

A post that attracts new visitors is worth more than a piece that regular visitors click on. Denton lets you know that in an internal memo. "Each of the new visitors can be converted to a returning visitor."

Unique visitors underline the growth of the visit. According to Denton, the standard with which advertisers measure and decide whether they spend their money at a certain site. With the new targets that are being hung up, Denton believes that it stimulates its own news.

In the early days of Gawker Media, the blogs had to focus on spitting out as many posts as possible. That changed quickly and a bonus was set for employees based on page views. With disappointing economic conditions, at the end of 2008 the ax went into the bonuses. These would no longer be paid out. When it turned out that the setback in online advertising was fine for the parties, the performance-dependent bonuses were set up again.

For now, each site of the publisher gets its own target, the average number of unique visitors of the last 12 months. For example, if a site goes 13 percent over the set number, the writers receive on average a 13 percent bonus in addition to their fixed salary. The distribution of the bonus lies with the chief editor.